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Chronicle of Higher Education, 9/19/11

Summary:

The Department of Education recently informed the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools that the "commission is still not in compliance with some rules and is asking the accreditor to further deal with its concerns by January 12." This is the latest notification in a process dating to June 2011, when the Department found that the new general education requirements at Northern Kentucky University did not meet SACS' own standards and that the accreditor did not have procedures in place to respond to faculty complaints about the new curriculum.

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AuthorKeith Blakeman

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Chronicle of Higher Education, 9/19/11

Summary:

Link to a story about the impact of a proposed 10% cut over ten years to "Medicare's 'indirect medical education' appropriations to teaching hospitals." The president of the Association of American Medical Colleges stated that such cuts woule mean that "up to 10,000 fewer physicians would be trained each year at a time when the organization is predicting a shortage of 90,000 doctors over the next decade."

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AuthorKeith Blakeman
CategoriesMedia Coverage

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Chronicle of Higher Education, 9/18/11

Summary:

Link to a news story about low-cost online education provider StraigherLine. The story explains that more and more "traditional" colleges are refusing to become partners and recognize StraighterLine courses for credit. Most of the 21 partner institutions are private-sector colleges or colleges catering to working adult students.

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AuthorKeith Blakeman

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Higher Ed Watch, 9/6/11

Summary:

Link to a commentary by Stephen Burd at Higher Ed Watch that discusses recent allegations of how some for-profits are manipulating placement rates. The commentary is based on the testimony of two former career services employees at two different for-profits. 

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AuthorKeith Blakeman
CategoriesMedia Coverage

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The Atlantic, 9/6/11

Summary:

Link to a commentary by Andrew P. Kelly, a research fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, that argues that for-profit colleges could "become the IBM of higher education." He argues that the for-profit companies could leverage what they have learned about growing enrollment, providing courses convenient for working adults, and getting students through two-year programs into a consulting practice to support more traditional schools. This innovative business model may not draw as much political attention. 

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AuthorKeith Blakeman
CategoriesMedia Coverage

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Chronicle of Higher Education, 7/26/11

Summary:

Link to a column by Sandy Baum and Michael McPherson that argues that the need for post secondary education in the American economy does not limit that education to bachelor's degrees. Arguing for an approach based on realism and pragmatism, they state, "The valuable opportunities provided by open-access postsecondary institutions do encourage the ambitions of many youth, but may shield some of them from the reality of what happens to many students when they actually enroll in these institutions—and at the same time diminish incentives to prepare academically while in high school."

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AuthorKeith Blakeman

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Frontline, "College's Statements," July 2011

PBS Ombudsman, 7/8/11

Summary:

The Frontline website includes a section with written responses from the four schools profiled in the piece. These responses generally criticize the program for airing a skewed report.

The PBS Ombudsman published a column discussing the Frontline story and the ethics behind it. The ombudsman concludes: "I would give it a lower grade [than an A] for the journalistic presentation of the Westwood segment, but I stop short of agreeing that they violated PBS editorial guidelines." However, the Ombudsman also includes the GAO report as evidence of wrong-doing by the schools.

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AuthorKeith Blakeman
CategoriesMedia Coverage

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Inside Higher Ed, 7/11/11

Summary:

Link to a news summary of a hearing conducted by the postsecondary education panel of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, and the House Oversight and Government Reform Subcommittee on Regulatory Affairs, Stimulus Oversight and Government Spending. The Republican members of the committees called the hearing and used the forum to express opposition to the new regulations and promise to continue fighting them.

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AuthorKeith Blakeman

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Chronicle of Higher Education, 6/28/11

Summary:

Link to an opinion piece by Frank Donoghue that argues against the conclusions of a recent report from the Center for Law and Social Policy. This report concluded that since the number of high school graduates and new traditional-aged college students will decline in the next decade, the US economy needs more adults to start, and more importantly, complete college degrees. Donoghue disagrees that the economy is dependent on more college graduates and that everyone should be encouraged to attend college. He also opposes the idea because private sector colleges are better positioned to educate adults than public and private traditional colleges.

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AuthorKeith Blakeman
CategoriesMedia Coverage

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Chronicle of Higher Education, 6/20/11

Summary:

Link to an opinion piece by Frank Donoghue that investigates the larger implications of the recent regulations. Specifically, he wonders, with other commentators what the results would look like if the GE rules were applied to all college programs. Indeed, he indicates that this might be the direction of regulation because the rule "represents the federal government’s first attempt to assess the value of various kinds of postsecondary educations."

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AuthorKeith Blakeman
CategoriesMedia Coverage

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Chronicle of Higher Education, 6/20/11

Summary:

Link to an opinion piece by Sandy Baum and Michael McPherson that argues that the debate over federal regulation of private-sector colleges should shift from the current partisan divisions to one founded on data. Their central point is that "the character of the for-profit sector has changed as it is increasingly dominated by large, publicly held companies that are compelled by shareholders to maximize profit." 

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AuthorKeith Blakeman
CategoriesMedia Coverage