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Inside Higher Education, 10//6/11

Summary:

This commentary by Jeb Bush and Jim Hunt, argues that in the face of evidence that "most degree-seeking individuals today no longer fit the traditional image of a college student who goes directly from high school to a four-year college or university, lives in a dormitory, eats in a dining hall, and walks from building to building for instruction," public colleges and universities must change and embrace the potential of online education. While the authors point out that online education is not a panacea, they view it as a fundamental part of a new business model for public-sector schools.

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AuthorKeith Blakeman

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American Association of Community Colleges, October 2011

Summary:

This new report, authored by Christopher Mullin, found that "over the past 20 years, the percent increase in credentials awarded has been double the percent increase in enrollment. These findings are even more pronounced for students of color. Consistent with other research, actual rates of transfer for students are much higher than commonly reported as well."

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AuthorKeith Blakeman

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National Center for Education Statistics, October 2011

Summary:

This new report, based on data from the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study, found that "From 2000 to 2008, the percentage of undergraduates enrolled in at least one distance education class expanded from 8 percent to 20 percent, and the percentage enrolled in a distance education degree program increased from 2 percent to 4 percent."

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AuthorKeith Blakeman

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Center for American Progress, 10/4/11

Summary:

Link to a brief on the impact of increasing use of information technology in higher education. Beyond the convenience for students and teachers, this continually increasing reliance on technology will produce data needed to personalize higher education. "Today, we treat higher education as a 'black-box' experience managed by the intuition of faculty and administrators. . . . Tomorrow, information technology will provide more cost-effective ways to ensure that students enroll in and learn from the courses best suited to them while better managing their student experience to boot."

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AuthorKeith Blakeman

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Complete College America, September 2011

Summary:

A new report from Complete College America analyzes the graduation data related to part-time and adult students. The standard federal completion data ignores these growing groups of students. Among the findings:

  • "Seventy-five percent of today’s students are juggling some combination of families, jobs, and school while commuting to class."
  • "Part-time students rarely graduate. Even when given twice as long to complete certificates and degrees, no more than a quarter ever make it to graduation day."
  • Poor students and students of color struggle the most to graduate.
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AuthorKeith Blakeman

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Chronicle of Higher Education, 9/18/11

Summary:

Link to a news story about low-cost online education provider StraigherLine. The story explains that more and more "traditional" colleges are refusing to become partners and recognize StraighterLine courses for credit. Most of the 21 partner institutions are private-sector colleges or colleges catering to working adult students.

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AuthorKeith Blakeman

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Committee on Measures of Student Success, 9/2/11

Summary:

The Committee on Measures of Student Success, tasked by the Education Department with improving success measures associated with community colleges, released preliminary recommendations. These recommendations "include a call for part-time, degree-seeking students at community colleges to be counted toward federally reported graduation and transfer rates." 

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AuthorKeith Blakeman

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Education Sector, 8/3/11

Summary:

Kevin Carey, policy director at Education Sector, authored a new report that integrates analysis of debt and graduation rates. Education Sector's explanation indicates that the authors "created a new, comprehensive measure, the 'borrowing-to-credential ratio.' For each college, [the authors] have taken newly available U.S. Department of Education data showing the total amount of money borrowed by undergraduates and divided that sum by the total number of degrees awarded."

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AuthorKeith Blakeman

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Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, 8/4/11

Summary:

New report from Anthony Carnevale and the team at CEW analyzing "what else besidesa degree might influence an individual’s potential earnings." They investigated degree attainment, occupation, age, race, and gender and found that, in addition to degree earned, race and occupation influence lifetime earnings.

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AuthorKeith Blakeman

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Chronicle of Higher Education, 7/26/11

Summary:

Link to a column by Sandy Baum and Michael McPherson that argues that the need for post secondary education in the American economy does not limit that education to bachelor's degrees. Arguing for an approach based on realism and pragmatism, they state, "The valuable opportunities provided by open-access postsecondary institutions do encourage the ambitions of many youth, but may shield some of them from the reality of what happens to many students when they actually enroll in these institutions—and at the same time diminish incentives to prepare academically while in high school."

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AuthorKeith Blakeman

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Center on Education and the Workforce, June 2011

Summary:

Report written by Anthony P. Carnevale and Stephen J. Rose that argues the United States has been underproducing college graduates since 1980. This situation led to "two distinct problems: a problem of efficiencyand a problem of equity." This means that the US economy has not been as efficient and productive as it could have been and the lack of graduates exacerbated the income disparity between high school and college graduates.

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AuthorKeith Blakeman

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Inside Higher Ed, 6/13/11

Summary:

Analysis of the new gainful employment regulations that argues the rules represent a major shift in how the federal government evaluates higher education. The author argues "The agency has written into federal policy, for the first time, a direct (if crude) attempt to measure the value of an academic program, by linking a measure of student expenditure (student loan debt burden) with an outcome measure (graduates’ average income)." The author also warns other programs that the federal government will likely expand this approach beyond the current for-profit programs.

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AuthorKeith Blakeman

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Inside Higher Ed, 5/26/11

Summary:

Commentary by Daniel J. Solove, professor of law at the George Washington University Law School, on the implications of the proposed gainful employment regulations on transparency. His argument starts from the provision of actual earnings data to ED by the Social Security Administration. This data will not be accessible by the public or the institutions.

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AuthorKeith Blakeman